Baitcasting reels date back to the mid-17th century and first became popular in the 1870s. They are suited best to fishing for larger freshwater fishing species such as largemouth bass, northern pike, and muskellunge. Larger sizes are used for trolling for large saltwater fish such as marlin and tuna. Casting with baitcasting tackle can be difficult for first-time anglers to get the hang of, but can be mastered with practice.[1]

DICK’S Sporting Goods-sponsored professional bass angler Skeet Reese sat down with PRO TIPS to share his thoughts on a topic that countless fishermen are familiar with: overcoming the intimidation factor of baitcasting reels. For many, branching out from the comfort zone of spinning or spincast reels into baitcasters can be tough sell, but Reese — an 8-time B.A.S.S. tournament winner, 2007 Toyota Bassmaster Angler of the Year and 2009 Bassmaster Classic Champion — is here to help anglers learn what to look for in purchasing a specific model, the advantages that baitcasters offer when the chips are down, plus the best way to avoid the dreaded “birds nest” and make most out of your time on the water.  So, it’s time to put down that spinning reel and get acquainted with mastering baitcasters.
But the best part about this baitcasting reel is the fact that it can be used with any fishing line thanks to its ceramic insert-line guide. Moreover, it features a rubber cork handle that is slip resistant with a soft-touch and over-sized knobs to provide anglers comfortable grip even when it is wet. But what really makes it light in weight is its carbon construction for the handle, side plates and the body.
The KastKing Rover Round Baitcasting Reel has a lot of unique features which makes it to be a top pick for most fishermen and to be top rated. It features carbon fiber star drag system (up to 20 LB / 9 KG), 3.6:1 gear ratio, and six premium shielded stainless steel ball bearings (6 + 1 BBs on Size 40 – 60, 4 + 1 BBs on 70 – 90). It also features a line out clicker alarm 2-pin centrifugal brakes which provides a constant pressure at each cast and weighs 15.8 ounces
Baitcasters fall into the power fishing category as they are designed to handle heavier lures/baits and handle more aggressive fishing techniques or actions on the water. An example of this type of fishing could include punching weighted lures through lily pads or thick forage, cranking or speed trolling. The spinning reel does better with smaller lures and “finesse fishing” techniques, which would include sensitivity and “feeling” the smallest and lightest fishing bites. This would include fishing techniques like drop-shotting, jigging, bobber fishing, etc. There are many camps with various definitions on what power and finesse fishing is, but in my opinion the baitcasting reel lends best to the power fishing category.
The braking system is magnetic and gives some great control to the line. This is a system that was designed for braided line and big catches and even bigger water, around 300 yards much. The drag is 25-30 pounds – bound to stand strong against some of the big waters mightier foes. Okuma has proven recently that their products are nothing to scoff at and this one is no different, ensuring that this reel will take you to open waters and keep you satisfied.

    This reel is one of my favorite Bait casting all the collection of Daiwa.  Just becouse, This ZILLION TYPE HD can able to do all most all kinds of my fishing activity. This Hard Duty version of Zillion can use for Black Bass fishing to Amazon monster fish.   I can use casting weight of 7g~up to 150g.  In France I use 13cm PROREX Classic shad , SPINTAIL Shad ,Spinnerbait and Jerkbail. Just like normal Pike fishing in France. 
To adjust your braking system, either engage your brakes by pushing the interior levers towards, or disengage them by pushing the braking levers away from the center. Disengaging brakes allows for longer casts but have a higher chance of backlashing. For a video guide on how to engage and disengage centrifugal braking systems, you can check out this video below.
Now it is time check if the brake settings suit you! You will only know this after making some casts, so now it’s time to go fishing! If you’re far away from the nearest water but still want to practice, you could try to find an open field (this is often a good idea when practicing, because it is easier to focus on technique and best practice when there are no chance of catching fish).
Additional things to consider when buying a baitcasting reel are the frames and ball bearings. Their frames are either machined or die cast. They are made from two different materials of aluminum or graphite and at times a mixture of the two. Durable and quality frames are usually made from a single strand of material. Ball bearings are featured to allow the free run of the reel and provide support to the gears too. Here, quality takes priority over the number and quantity. Therefore you should look out for those signed as stainless, or shielded or double shielded.
It was kind of a disappointment from the start.My fingers had a hard time adjusting the spool tensioner on the left (craking) side.Then the tensioner wouldn’t stay adjusted.This turned out to be rubber discs in the tensioner caps on both sides so I ditched those (all while at the water mind you) for round discs cut from a plastic milk container.This seemed to help a good bit over the rubber.

It features a magnetic brake system with five magnets and 0-10 magnetic dial-in settings for a backlash-free casting experience, a 7.1:1 high-speed gear ratio for smooth and silent line retrieve. Its line retrieve per turn is 30in. Its 3-washer drag system has an 18LB max drag power. It's also equipped with 5+1 bearings. The spool takes both monofilament and braided fishing line. Its mono capacity is 10lb/120yd while the braid capacity is 30lb/120yd.
For any serious angler out there, eventually, you will be upgrading your reel from a spinning reel to a baitcaster reel. Due to its durability, strength and high level of control, baitcasters win with experienced fishermen. Like most other products, baitcasters come in all sizes and performance levels. Usually, price does indicate the quality level you will get but that’s not a set rule. Also, each brand will produce reels with different features that you may or may not need, depending on your style of fishing and what your goal is.

​Of course, you can learn to fish professionally without ever using such a fishing reel, but you may want to remember that: many professional anglers and deep-sea anglers use such equipment because they provide more control when it comes to bigger play. Very often, you will see this type of fishing reel when anglers go out to catch tuna, sailfish, and marlin in rough water. Of course, if you are after such a game, you would need a huge and sturdy overhead reel that can handle the heavy line, bulky bait and consequent drag that both lines and baits provide when they are dragging in the water.


Why? Because baitcasting reels around the $100 mark are a notch above those that are, let’s say, $80 and under. Because of that, I thought it would be a good idea to write about the Best Baitcasting Reel Under $100 in order to talk about the differences once we approach that $100 mark, and to help you decide if spending the extra money is worth it or not.
Going through the above list would indeed leave you with a good remark of how each reel has been designed with exceptional uniqueness and features even at the different price range. However, only one of the above can be considered the best of them all, and that is The Kastking Royale Legend/Whitemax Low Profile Baitcasting Fishing Reel. Although this reel comes at a very low price, it is arguably the best as it is packed with so many features you wouldn’t even get from the costliest on the list. Added to this fact, it is a product of KastKing which is an ICAST award-winning brand

Stop mechanisms are another element that routinely upsets untrained anglers using this type of reel. Essentially, the stop mechanism prevents your line from continuing after completion of the draw. There are two different types of slowdown mechanisms out there, though some reels currently use half-and-half of the two. These two slowing down mechanisms are centrifugal brakes and attractive brakes.
This reel is built to last, with brass gears, a corrosion-resistant X2-Craftic alloy frame and eight stainless steel ball bearings. The palm side plate is made of carbon to reduce the reel’s overall weight, while the aluminum handle side plate adds strength and durability. Available with a left or right-handed setup, the reel also includes large EVA knobs on the handle for improved grip when fighting larger fish. 
Fishing with baitcasters definitely has advantages. More line capacity. Using heavier, thicker lines. Casting distance, as well, should be one of them. Many anglers, however, are not optimizing their reels and their technique to get the most casting distance when bass fishing with casting reels. More distance often equates to more time presenting a lure to fish. 
Unique feature: Shimano has their own flagships. Their technology is top-notch and nearly unbeatable. With the micromodule gear, X-SHIP system which efficiently transmits the input power, enabling powerful reeling and SHIMANO’s newest innovation in brake system technology, SVS Infinity provides easy-to-manage, consistent spool control, and brake force the Shimano Chronarch is one unique baitcasting reel.
Made from lightweight graphite, this lightweight breeze-fishing reel offers rugged durability that withstands severe saltwater conditions. The lightweight yet robust graphite edges and side panels provide safety against consumption and edge bending without disturbing the mast. Also, the reel with its treated steel pinion device and the basic bronze rigging allows a gentle tightening, even if it is under great pressure.
With a baitcaster the line comes straight from the starting guide on the spool and the spool is actually circulating. When fishing a spinning reel, the line is being spooled in a 90 degree corner, on the spool by a rotor. The spool itself if not circulating, it only moves up en down in order to have the line equally divided on the spool. Thanks to the difference in construction, but also because of the fact a baitcaster’s spool is constructed on both sides, a baitcaster is stronger/ can handle more pressure than
SR: When casting sidearm, you have a much wider area through rotation of the cast where you can release the lure. When you cast overhead, that window of when you can release the lure for a proper cast becomes much smaller. And the most common [mistake] is a late release, which means the lure comes crashing down much faster. And that’s when the backlash happens. So, sidearm is a safer cast, but learning how to load your rod up with the energy of the lure is the key to distance.
Fishing with baitcasters definitely has advantages. More line capacity. Using heavier, thicker lines. Casting distance, as well, should be one of them. Many anglers, however, are not optimizing their reels and their technique to get the most casting distance when bass fishing with casting reels. More distance often equates to more time presenting a lure to fish. 
This reel can be summed up in one word, amazing. The KastKing brand is known for their amazing craftsmanship and long lasting durability. The Royale Legend baitcasting fishing reel is unmatched in almost every category. It’s fitted with an extremely silent 7.0:1 high speed line retrieve that just about every angler can appreciate. This reel comes fitted with state of the art dual brakes. These brakes can be quickly and easily tuned to every anglers specific needs not to mention the amazing casting control this provides. It features a brass structure that is precision cut accompanied with a carbon fiber drag system that delivers an astounding 17.5 pounds of drag. It helps you land even the hardest fighting fish. The 11+1 stainless steel ball bearings are corrosion resistant and allow for smooth casting and lifelong reliability. This baitcasting reel is perfect for any style of fishing, from flipping to pitching and anything in between. You’ll appreciate this flipping reel for years to come.

Another thing to consider is whether to go with a low profile or round profile body design. A round profile reel is gripped from the back delivering more power to throw big baits and go after larger fish. It also usually has a larger line capacity. If you’ll be going after bigger fish such as salmon, muskie, or steelhead, a round profile is the best while a low profile reel is more comfortable to fish with.
Using a good baitcasting reel supplies a good level of casting control and helps you improve your fishing accuracy. This is mainly because you can adjust and control the speed and distance of your lure when casting with by holding the spool with your thumb. After a good period of use when you have become proficient in using it, your casting accuracy would have improved. Therefore, you can pinpoint easily with high accuracy thus enabling you to throw the lure to the exact location of the fish.
There is nothing more relaxing than hitting the water, relaxing and maybe getting one or two fish. It is an incredible way to break the ice with individuals. With a shabby, untrustworthy bait-casting reel, no uncertainty will destroy what you wanted to keep for a decent trip. Regardless of whether it does not work the way it should, or whether you like it, it is never a decent time.

Finally, the Curado’s perfectly balanced Super Free spool gives you smooth, long casts by removing spool shaft friction. In regular baitcasting reels, the pinion gear is freed when the clutch bar is pressed, and the gear then drags on the spool shaft. This results in friction that can shorten casting distance. The Super Free spool uses a ball bearing to support the pinion gear, keeping the gear and the spool shaft perfectly aligned when the clutch is disengaged and reducing the friction to zero.
Lastly, the best brake system on a baitcaster reel is your thumb. No matter what special braking system technology your reel has, your thumb will always be needed. You’ll have to learn how to apply the right amount of pressure on the line to slow down the spool as needed. This is something you’ll have to practice, and it doesn’t take long to get good at. It’s mandatory to learn to avoid backlashes and get those accurate casts.
All baitcasting reels have a gear ratio, simply put, the gear ratio is the speed of the reel. The gear ratio is the number of times the spool turns over when the handle is rotated once. The most common ratio is 6.4:1, the spool turns six times during one handle rotation. The higher the number, the more line can be retrieved with the same amount of work.
This is why: the brake is for preventing the spool from ‘overspinning’ at the start of the cast, whereas the spool tension is there to prevent the spool from spinning at the end of the cast (=the moment your bait hits the water). They both serve a specific purpose, namely to ultimately prevent the dreaded backlashes from happening in the beginning, during, and after your cast.

An important thing you should always do is to go for the best and comfortable tool. You shouldn’t trade that for anything as you wouldn’t want to spend the after-fishing time nursing the pain gotten from using a tool. Therefore, if your choice of baitcasting reel doesn’t offer you maximum comfort-ability when you hold, it would hinder you from being a skilled angler. A comfortable grip and balanced combination of rod and reel would help you achieve more accuracy and improved casting. We have tested out different baitcasting reels and their working mechanism along with their features such as tensioners, drag settings, thumb latches, and others.
To get started with learning to use your baitcasting reel, mount the reel to the rod and string the line through guides. Heavier lines are easier to learn with so use a line with a breaking strength in the upper end of the line range that is recommended for the reel. On the end of your line, tie on a 1/2oz casting weight to practice with instead of a lure. The easiest thing to use as a casting weight would be a lead sinker. Have a few of them in various sizes handy.
Favored by tournament anglers as well as by serious fishermen going after bigger freshwater species, baitcasting reels are ideal for casting larger lures and baits great distances. They have the substance and smooth drags to stand up to gut-wrenching runs that big fish will make. Although they’re a little harder to master than spinning reels, baitcasting reels have become much easier to use thanks to modern technology. At TackleDirect, you’ll find hundreds of freshwater baitcasting reels from leading manufacturers like Shimano, Abu Garcia and Quantum. Because these reels can toss heavier lures and baits and handle bigger fish, many of them are also appropriate for inshore saltwater fishing. That means you can get even more out of these crossover reels, whether you’re fishing for largemouth in your local lake or for redfish, snook and seatrout in the mangroves.
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