To set your brake properly for the 1/2oz casting weight you tied on, start by raising your rod tip in front of you so the casting weight is hanging seven or eight feet above the ground. Depress the thumb bar on your reel to let the spool go into free spool and watch the line on the spool as the casting weight drops and hits the ground. Ideally, when the casting weight hits the ground the spool should stop spinning and paying out line. If the spool continues to spin when the casting weight hits the ground, you need to tighten the brake a bit. If the casting weight fails to drop to the ground then the brake is too tight and must be loosened. Make the necessary adjustment and repeat the process until the spool stops moving when the casting weight hits the ground.

Spool Size: Your decision on spool size should be directly related to the type of fishing you have in mind. Any reel that you are looking at will have the amount of a specific line test that the spool can be fitted with. Of course, the diameter and type of line can vary between companies, so keep in mind that the reel might be able to hold a little more or a little less than what is listed.
A great braking system is important with baitcasters as this will help prevent the brutal backlashes or “birds nest”. A backlash is when the spool over rotates after the lure has hit the water and these additional rotations cause the fishing line to bunch up on the reel. A good braking system will slow the spool down just before the end of the cast to ensure these additional rotations do not occur.

Personally I use a spinning reel when casting for species such as pike and asp, fishing for perch and fishing vertical. When I would be trolling for pike with larger lures, I switch to the baitcaster. When setting it in a rod rest I use a longer, more flexible rod and when keeping the rod in hands, I prefer a shorter, somewhat stiffer baitcaster rod. It is purely a matter of personal taste because I believe a traditional rod and spinning reel won’t catch less.
I’ts loaded with performance features bass anglers will love. It’s compact for easy palming, but has a large handle with oversized paddle knobs. The big knobs come in handy wrenching big fish out of cover. The brakes are easy to fine tune, thanks to four pins inside the sideplate and a fine adjustment dial on the outside. Perhaps the best part is being able to choose from 4 different gear ratios, from 5.6:1 all the way up to 8.3:1.
A baitcaster works well with all three line types: monofilament, fluorocarbon and braid. I use a baitcaster with monofilament for topwater baits such as Zara Spooks, twitching suspended stickbaits and cranking in the shallows or at mid-depths. A baitcaster with fluorocarbon is my choice for jig fishing, Texas-rigged soft plastics and deep cranking. I rely on a baitcaster filled with braid for buzz baits, plastic frogs and topwater chuggers.
However, there is a good argument for a reel in the lefthanded position as it does have many advantages over a handle on the right side. For example, you are not switching hands when you cast the line thus, fewer backlashes. This also allows you to work top-water baits better as the moment the bait hits the water you can start reeling without switching hands.
Another factor that will determine how your baitcaster performs is its gearing. Gear ratio tells an angler how many times the spool turns per one turn of the handle. The specification always puts the spool number first, then a colon, then the number 1 to represent the turn of the handle. For example, 6.2:1 means the spool turns 6.2 times with each full turn of the handle.
The low gear ratios like 5.2:1 and 5.3:1 are great for fishing baits that pull hard like deep diving crankbaits, big swimbaits, and slow rolling heavy spinnerbaits. The low gear ratio helps you reel the bait slower, keeping it in the strike zone longer. You also enjoy a higher torque output on these reels, making them a nice choice for flipping and moving fish out of cover.
A great spool is lightweight for speed but can handle the elements as well. Typical material for spools is aluminum because it’s so light. A forged aluminum spool is best as it’s a tougher metal and doesn’t get damaged or scratched as easily. Manufacturers are drilling holes into their spools for that lighter weight and quicker spin (air dynamics & weight).
It was kind of a disappointment from the start.My fingers had a hard time adjusting the spool tensioner on the left (craking) side.Then the tensioner wouldn’t stay adjusted.This turned out to be rubber discs in the tensioner caps on both sides so I ditched those (all while at the water mind you) for round discs cut from a plastic milk container.This seemed to help a good bit over the rubber.
The Shimano Tranx TRX500HG Baitcasting Reel is the perfect solution for deep-sea anglers who want to combine the pinpoint accuracy of a baitcaster with the power needed to target offshore species such as tuna, grouper and billfish. The reel features eight corrosion-resistant ball bearings and an aluminum frame coated with a special treatment that locks out saltwater.

First, I bought a baitcaster reel+rod combo for $85 in Walmart, about 2 years ago, because I really wanted to get in to learn baitcasting. It is a brand name, most fishermen would recognize, I won't say no more, because they do have excellent products, but some of the gear, what they make is just horrifyingly bad. So as a beginner, I started practicing on that and of course, all I was getting was backlashes and it just felt so useless and cheap. The entire practice was just a major frustration and I completely given up trying to learn and the rod+reel combo ended up in my garage and swore that I will never touch it again.
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