Both models have a 5.3:1 gear ratio and 3 + 1 stainless steel ball bearings, giving this round reel one of the smoothest in its class. It also comes in both a left and right hand model. It is packed with performance with a very good price point. It is a bit heavier, but it also is a larger round reel and weighs 11.3oz. It is great for any type of fishing, but most use it as a catfish baitcasting reel. You can't go wrong with this reel.
A: There are a few quick-tips and basic knowledges that will help you out. First off, don’t overfill the spool and correct your casting motion. Make sure not to overextend your arm or keep it too straight, keep the strength in your flicking motion. This prevents future injuries and makes your cast count. Some other basics involve using plenty of line when you cast – ensuring that you’re getting distance at all.

Baitcasters are for very important for anglers who want the extra control that they cannot get with a spinning reel. Good baitcasters can give you a lot more control and you can cast your lure exactly where it needs to go. If you ever watch the professional fishing tournaments, the only type of reel you mostly see is a baitcaster. In this article, I want to explore and find the best baitcasting reel for beginners and professionals.


If you are going after the bigger fish and need a reel that can take on heavier loads, this baitcaster is phenomenal. It’s got a sleek, fantastic design that works as good as it looks. It’s got a gear ratio of 5.4:1 and has extra torque, so you can reel in the catch of the day with hardly any struggle at all – and if that fish is a little feisty, the bent carbon handle won’t get uncomfortable for you.

The gear ratio quickly summed up is the speed of your reel. The ratio is represented by x:1, and the x represents how many times the spool rotates for each single crank of the handle. For example, a gear ratio of 6.2:1 means the spool will rotate 6.2 times for each handle crank. Depending on the type of fishing you’re doing a higher gear ratio is typically more advantageous. For example, when covering a bunch of water, you’ll want to do a lot of casting and that means quick retrieval to get your lure back to the boat and out for another cast. A higher gear ratio speeds this process up to ensure you’re getting the most line in for each crank of the handle.


First, I bought a baitcaster reel+rod combo for $85 in Walmart, about 2 years ago, because I really wanted to get in to learn baitcasting. It is a brand name, most fishermen would recognize, I won't say no more, because they do have excellent products, but some of the gear, what they make is just horrifyingly bad. So as a beginner, I started practicing on that and of course, all I was getting was backlashes and it just felt so useless and cheap. The entire practice was just a major frustration and I completely given up trying to learn and the rod+reel combo ended up in my garage and swore that I will never touch it again.
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