Another thing to consider is whether to go with a low profile or round profile body design. A round profile reel is gripped from the back delivering more power to throw big baits and go after larger fish. It also usually has a larger line capacity. If you’ll be going after bigger fish such as salmon, muskie, or steelhead, a round profile is the best while a low profile reel is more comfortable to fish with.
The reel uses an 11-bearing system with a generous number of ten ball bearings and an additional roller one. The ball bearings are shielded and resistant to corrosion. As a result, they are durable and enable long-distance casts. Since it is an affordable reel, keep in mind you might face a backlash now and then, but it is still a good deal for the money.
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If you’ve read this site, you can tell we are fans of Shimano fishing reels. The Chronarch MGL 150 tops our list of all baitcasting reels. The Chronarch MGL is at the top of medium price-range. It costs more than a budget reel, but still nowhere near the cost of magnesium framed reels. What leaves you with is a high quality, high performance baitcasting reel you can count on.
Featuring centrifugal brake system, you don’t have to worry about backlashes while retrieving this baitcasting reel's cast. The brakes are easy to access via an open side-plate for quick adjustments. Besides, the reel's main components and the shaft are made of stainless steel while the frame and body from aluminum alloy which guarantees its durability, rigidity and optimal performance. Even better, the construction is corrosion resistant making it easy to maintain the reel. 
Press down on the reel spool with your thumb to stop the bait when it reaches the target. This is similar to pressing the button on a spincasting reel to brake the line; however, not applying your thumb soon enough leads to the spool continuing to turn after your bait hits the water, creating an overrun or "birds nest" that you'll have to straighten out before you can retrieve your lure.[7]
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Spinning reels are engineered for casting light baits ( which is not the case for every spinning reel), but with a baitcaster, the possibilities are endless. You can do Deep crankbaits, Big swimbait, Deepwater swimbaits, squarebill crankbaits, shallow spinnerbaits, Texas Rigs, Carolina Rigs, jerk baits, topwater etc with a baitcaster. (Note, specific bait presentation requires specific gear ratio).
The Baitcasting reels are a bit confusing things to choose from a thousand from the market. From the beginning of fishing, saltwater reels were just made of brass and other materials. But the problem is, saltwater puts a quite heavy effect on metals as the rate of oxidation gets high. This is exactly why wise brands decided to make reels for saltwater.
Lever Drag Baitcasters – Instead of using the star dial, these baitcasters have a lever on the  outside of the reel frame. Lever drags will first push to the strike setting, then all the way down to the max setting. They do usually have a dial for fine adjustment. The bonus of a lever drag is it sets in an instant by simply pushing the lever. As you push the lever, it should gradually gain resistance all the way up to strike and then again up to max.

The next thing to take note of when making a purchase is the spool size of the reel. If you are interested in going for a bigger or stronger fish during your fishing adventure, you will definitely need to get a heavier line. For such heavier lines, you would agree that they would take more space on the spool and hence, you may have to consider buying a reel which has a deeper spool and has enough space to hold the line of your choice completely. Impliedly, the bigger the size of the fish you are aiming at, the larger the size of the spool you will need.
This is a great case where the specifications of a reel can be a bit deceptive. A lot of low quality reels might boast a whole lot of bearings, but if they aren’t of high quality you might be better off with half the amount of extremely well made ones. These are especially vital to allow for smooth casting, increasing your accuracy and decreasing your chances of a messy backlash.
The Legend is our best well-rounded pick because of its affordability and above average marks in just about every category. The line and the casting are more than good, frame is sufficient, and the lightness is another perk. A lasting point for this reel has to be its saltwater compatibility. So you’re not stuck to using this reel in just freshwater settings.
Hold the reel properly. Grip the rod behind the reel with your thumb resting over the reel spool. Baitcasting rods are designed the same as spincasting rods, and as with spincasting rods, most fishermen cast with the same hand they retrieve with, so if you prefer to hold the rod behind the reel when you retrieve, you'll need to switch hands when you cast.[3]
This year, I changed my mind after watching others and here I am with 30+ years of fishing experience, but can't use a baitcaster. So I took the reel off the rod, and bought one of these. Still didn't want to get anything pro with 4x the price of this, because I was afraid, that this will also ends up in the garage or the trash and didn't want to waste to much money.
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